Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

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Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Fri Dec 28, 2018 9:12 pm

Repton 3 got a panning at least: https://archive.org/details/zzapp_64_is ... i/page/n21

I can't stand Repton. Compared to the Boulder Dashes, I do indeed find them contrived, clumsy and needlessly involved. Later on from Zzap, Commodore Format used to mock the games as most of us really did prefer Boulder Dash.

Though BBC owners swore by Repton, declaring it more advanced in terms of puzzle elements and skill. So why the divide? What was it in our cultures or something which made the exact same game look, feel and play differently to us?

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by richardtoohey » Fri Dec 28, 2018 11:01 pm

Maybe it depends where you started from?

I never played Boulder Dash BITD; my first experience of that sort of game was Repton and Repton 2.

But never felt any rabid dislike for any other games/computers/genres/whatever because of it ...

Maybe Commodore users (some of them anyway) had a degree of NIH? Or vice versa?

But think this will descend into Windows/Mac, vim/emacs, Spectrum/C64/BBC, Atari ST/Amiga blah-de-blahs very quickly!

Maybe I'll fire up a C64 emulator and see what the games were like on the C64 (are you saying there were Repton ports to C64?)
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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by flynnjs » Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:04 am

richardtoohey wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 11:01 pm
But think this will descend into Windows/Mac, vim/emacs, Spectrum/C64/BBC, Atari ST/Amiga blah-de-blahs very quickly!
It won't or I'll lock the thread. Keep it constructive people.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Sat Dec 29, 2018 1:34 am

I only knew of Repton on the 64 until I looked into BBC games only a few years ago.

I don't want this topic to be a hate match either, it's just I find it fascinating how Repton can be such a polarising game. Usually it's been a case of one version of a game being not so good as the same one on another console. But I remember no dramatic technical differences here, barring Acorn versions of Repton requiring keyboard input.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by richardtoohey » Sat Dec 29, 2018 2:50 am

(Sorry wasn't meaning to lower the tone, just saying!)
repton3c64.jpg
Having had a look at the C64 Repton it's a bit more like the Electron version - a bit cluttered. The BBC version used a lot more (well, all) of the screen.

Repton definitely got a place in my heart because when it first came out for the BBC B there was nothing like it. Fast, smooth, fun, great music, etc.

By the time this C64 port of Repton 3 came out ... the world had moved on. So maybe C64 owners shrugged and said "what's all the fuss about?"

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by sydney » Sat Dec 29, 2018 11:58 am

My thoughts as an electron and C64 owner from bitd.

1 Repton isn't a very good game.
There. I said it. I don't like Repton. I don't like the graphics, I don't like the sound effects and I don't like the gameplay. That was as an electron owner, now as a beeb owner I feel the same. As a C64 owner the graphics are poor, sound effects and music are terrible and the gameplay boring.

2 Lots of competition on the C64.
The beeb game market was much smaller the the C64 market. The good games on the C64 were as good as or better than the best games on the Beeb. The bad games were better than the bad games on the Beeb. Repton was better than most games on the Beeb whereas it was distinctly mid table on the C64.

3 Hype
All reviews of Repton on the Beeb were positive. Produced by the top software house on the Beeb. Large, full page adverts in the Beeb/electron magazines.
Superior probably couldn't complete with the likes of oceans advertising budget so fewer people knew about it.

4 Style / genre
The Repton style of game was probably seen as old fashioned by the time Repton 3 came out on the C64.

5 Difficulty
Repton requires a bit of thought to play well. I found games on the C64 tended to be dumbed down to accommodate the less able gamers. If a game was too hard it would flop. A prime example is Exile. On the C64 you are essentially given the pistol after entering the tunnel system whereas on the Beeb you have to solve several problems in order to get it.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by BigEd » Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:01 pm

I liked Repton - still do - it's smooth, it's large, the music is great, and it's a puzzle game.

If the Elk or C64 versions were smaller, or had too few tiles on the display, or weren't so smooth, I can see why they mightn't have been so well-liked.

But then, as noted, times change, and maybe action rather than puzzle was the favoured genre on the C64 at the time Repton arrived. (I think Impossible Mission was the first C64 game I saw.)

Edit: looks like Beeb shows 8x8 tiles and C64 shows only 7x5.

Image
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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by sydney » Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:20 pm

Just thought of another reason:

6 free games on magazine covertapes:

Every month every C64 magazine gave away older games on the covertapes. I'm pretty sure even Elite was on a covertape. Why buy seemingly substandard games when games like paradroid are given for free?

I see why Beeb owners like repton. Within the realm of Beeb games it would be considered good. Here is the real reason I think C64 owners looked down on the Beeb in general, never mind just Repton:
The C64 is a better games machine than the Beeb.
The CPU was slower but everything else about it makes it a better games machine. The VIC 2 was designed to go into arcade machines of the day, the SID chip is to this day a revered sound chip, it had 16 colours, 64k of RAM, 2 built in joystick ports. It was the best selling 8 bit computer worldwide so had a massive market. Most of the best developers worked on it.
That the Beeb was able to compete at all is a tribute to the excellent developers who pushed the Beeb as far as they did.
I love the Beeb and as a computer it is so much better than a C64 but as a games machine it is definitely second best.
This is one of the reasons I want to write games. I'd love to try converting some of the C64 games I loved. I'd love to see IK+, Emlyn Hughes international soccer, paradroid... the list goes on.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by sydney » Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:21 pm

A reason for the difference in size of the tiles might be that the C64 only has 200 pixel vertical resolution.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Sat Jan 05, 2019 1:33 am

Thanks for all the answers. So there's my answer - Repton wasn't so hot on the 64 anyway, the window was smaller and the style was passe and seemingly copied.


I have one or two thoughts about the bits though.

I have played the BBC Repton, the only 'proper' experience, given the reception given to it by BBC owners. But I still found it sluggish and convoluted. I've always only been a lukewarm gamesplayer but that may or may not have an impact.

For Commodore games being dumbed down, there are examples. But also many games were hard as nails even for games reviewers, who had to be excellent games players. One example off the cuff is Lions Of The Universe, which Commodore Format thought was great but also a strain. I know that a huge number of puzzle and adventure games had Commodore reviewers enthralled too. (But I can't name any as I was never interested so much in those. Yes Prime Minister is about as deep as I go.)

For the BBC being not so good at rendering games, it's overall true for me. However, I was amazed at Firetrack on both the 64 and BBC equally. And the Beeb version of Pole Position is miles ahead of the 64 one and even the Atari 2600 one. I enjoyed that decades ago and still do. And thanks to the analogue joystick port on the BBC, games like Vortex or 3D Bomb Alley made gaming way smoother than I had mostly known it. Only when I got an Atari Trakball for the 64 a few years ago did I see how many stiff games suddenly eased up on that machine. Spitting Image was panned by many but they should have used a ball. I had a mouse in the 90s and should have used that more.

Though for the covertape situation, the real age of classic games on tape began at the turn of the 90s. By Commodore Format, cheaply licensed classics like Dropzone or demos of brand new stunners like Creatures or Lemmings helped blow the Beeb out of the water if only because development lasted much longer. During the 80s, there wasn't so much on magazines if anything, especially for the poor Electron users. I took a look at these tape images in very recent years, feeding them into my Beebs and they're mostly utter tat doubtless written in a rush by kids.


Also the Beeb has higher resolution but games look blockier. And the 64 had a reputation for blockiness too. The graphics mode the BBC appears to use for many games appears the same as the Vic 20's. Look at the size of the text.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by tricky » Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:51 am

I never played it much but:
I think that when the first one came out it didn't have as much competition, especially on the beeb and so looked better by comparison. By the time 3 came out, there was more competition and games had moved on a little. 3 had move elements to understand, which if you hadn't played 1 and 2 could make a higher barrier to entry.

With regard to blockieness, the beeb, c64 and CPC basically have the same choices, mode 1 less colours or mode 2 more colours. As the Beeb's palette is smaller it can't get away with mode 1 as easily, where as with the attribute modes and sprites, the c64 can often look good.

The demands of the game also make a huge difference as to how a game can look in a mode with less colours. The spectrum is usually complemented for its resolution, but sometimes criticized for its lack of colour.

The effort put in by the developer and time allowed by the publisher obviously also affects how good the game looks and how well it plays.

Games sometimes limit enemy movement to characters to simplify code, or save memory and on the speccy to avoid colour clash and for games with large sprites, this can be done without compromising game play. The c64 has it's sprites and hardware pixel scrolling and so rarely has to make the same compromises.

I always try to use mode 1, run at 50fps and move things one pixel at a time without flicker to get an arcade look and feel and try to get all the colours on screen at once, which I think helps to hide the usually reduced colour pallet on any given row.

The c64 certainly made all the right choices when it came to building a games machine for the arcade games of the time. These made it quicker and easier to develop for which attracted more developers and publishers.

The beeb had some amazing games back in the day and I think that I and the other homebrew developers have shown that there could have been many more if the market had been there to support the development.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by geraldholdsworth » Sat Jan 05, 2019 9:16 am

Another possible reason, which hasn't been mentioned, is that there was already a game called Repton for the C64 which was totally different to the Repton for the BBC. This Repton was more like the BBC's Planetoid, so that when Repton 3 came out for the C64 folk maybe wondered what happened to Repton 2 and therefore didn't bother with 3.

The C64 Repton 3 certainly never got the add-on packs that the BBC and Electron did (ATWIFS, LoR, RTT).
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www.reptonresourcepage.co.uk

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by davidb » Sat Jan 05, 2019 1:00 pm

I think some users tended to look down on ports of games from other platforms - I remember reading a review in a magazine that basically said that Micro Power's Ghouls was fine for a machine like the BBC Micro but that C64 users expected/deserved better.

Repton probably looked like a knock-off of Boulder Dash to C64 users, so that probably didn't help, though I thought that the Atari version of Boulder Dash was regarded as the "true" version by fans. :twisted:

Edt: Some C64 users do have fond memories of some BBC ports.
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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:33 pm

I came across Ghouls a few years ago and thought it was such a novelty having a BBC inside my 64. Physics were a national disgrace though, so I never stuck it for long. I wonder if the older brother games players, in their late 40s by now, have different muscle memories than those a few years younger like me. The Great Giana Sisters is supposed to be this platforming classic, in the same way as the Super Mario bros it was cloned from. But again, the physics are like controlling a JCB in comparison to the genuine NES game but most old 64 users swear blind that you 'have to have the feel'.

I think the BBC is an excellent machine for early arcade games. Though the lack of advanced features and kinky extras dated it fast. I don't recall seeing raster bars, parallax scrolling, hardware sprite capabilities or mixed screen modes on the BBC.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by BigEd » Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:38 pm

You can't say you haven't seen mixed screen modes, unless you haven't see Elite. Surely you have!

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:58 pm

I played Elite at school. I saw exactly what all the fuss was about and it was the boxed version with all the paperwork. I had it all to myself for hours, the payoff of being one of the only kids still wanting to use the machine by the turn of the 90s. Though I've not studied it for years.

How does mixed screen mode implement on the BBC? On the 64, hi-res dialogue boxes and screen dividers allow greater definition for text and icons on top of the full colour bitmap graphics underneath. That's a bit more visible - and a touch frustrating as on Strip Poker the hand of cards obscured the naughty bits. (Fortunately, my Action Replay 6 cartridge was handy to peel off the unnecessaries.)

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by BigEd » Sat Jan 05, 2019 9:10 pm

(Elite has the main, upper, part of the screen in low-colour high resolution and the lower part with the information panel in a more-colour lower resolution. You'll see various demos with scrollbars and the likes from today's work, but perhaps you're right that these CRTC techniques weren't used back in the day.)

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Andrew_Waite » Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:24 pm

Commie_User wrote:
Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:33 pm
I think the BBC is an excellent machine for early arcade games. Though the lack of advanced features and kinky extras dated it fast. I don't recall seeing raster bars, parallax scrolling, hardware sprite capabilities or mixed screen modes on the BBC.
Joffa Smith's Cobra for the Spectrum showed that machines with simple video hardware could do parallax scrolling if you were a ninja programmer. The key problem I think for gaming on the Acorn machines was that the base machines only had 32K of memory, where as games (Elite aside) had moved on to exploit the larger memories of the 64k CPC, 64k C64 and 48k Spectrum by the mid '80s. The new games would not fit inside the BBC 'B' or the Electron. And by the time the 64k and 128k B+ machines belatedly came out in 1985 the 68000 based Atari 520ST was available, Acorn had the ARM1, and the world was moving into the 32bit era.

What a difference if the Electron had been launched with eight 64kbitx1 memory chips instead of four! None of the double nibble rubbish that killed the speed of the machine. A 64k Electron with more memory than the 48k Spectrum and the 2MHz 6502A running at 2MHz over the whole of the memory map would have blown away the C64's 985kHz 6510.
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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by tricky » Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:53 pm

Jeltron http://www.retrosoftware.co.uk/wiki/index.php/Jeltron has both a mixed mode screen and paralax scrolling, although you wouldn't have seen it bitd unless you worked at one of the publishers. I remember some demos with raster bars, but as you say no hardware sprites, unless you count the various TV uses or the Domesday system.
I wonder if you could do the mixed video and gfx laser disc games wiith Simons new emulator.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:54 pm

That thought crossed my mind about the poor Elk. It was supposed to be the 'games' BBC but cut back on what resources the BBC already struggled with to compete as a gaming micro. It was supposed to be Acorn's Spectrum. Though while the Spectrum was also a hobbyist computer now used for games, it was cheap. So no joysticks, bad sound and graphic tricks all done in software was taken as the tradeoff by Spectrum kids. Acorn's variant was disabled yet expensive.

Perhaps eschewing the ULA, an affordable Elk could have shipped with the then-cheap 64K RAM, full BBC graphics and sound capabilities plus joystick socket instead. Maybe even ditch the RGB and card edge, having only RF, composite and tape sockets only. Acorn may have scratched out a few users wanting a posher machine than the ZX yet not being able to afford a 64, over a longer period than just the 1983 rush. BBC BASIC probably would have been a bigger selling point, ironically.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:58 pm

That Jeltron looks swift! I'll have to sit and have a good go with that very soon.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Andrew_Waite » Sun Jan 06, 2019 1:37 am

We got an Electron when I was 12 because the machine had BBC Basic, the BBC's OS and cost less than 200pounds. Maybe with hindsight Acorn would have done better to pursue the market the Electron was targeted at with a 64k BBC A+ inside a cost reduced case and keyboard instead of the Electron. The processor would have run at the full 2MHz across the whole of the memory map. Commodore made the C16, another cut down version of a successful machine, that was also a commercial failure. I guess before we get too critical of what these folks did 35 years ago, remember that Nintendo, Sega and the consoles cleaned up in the home games market, where as Acorn (in the guise of ARM) now dominates mobile computing. Commodore, Atari, Sinclair, Amstrad etc. are all long gone.

Wasn't the Spectrum a superior games machine to the C64 :D :twisted: ? Kim Justice thinks so. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wUnjoztg1Fg
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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by barbarossa69 » Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:09 am

Commie_User wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 9:12 pm
Repton 3 got a panning at least: https://archive.org/details/zzapp_64_is ... i/page/n21

I can't stand Repton. Compared to the Boulder Dashes, I do indeed find them contrived, clumsy and needlessly involved. Later on from Zzap, Commodore Format used to mock the games as most of us really did prefer Boulder Dash.

Though BBC owners swore by Repton, declaring it more advanced in terms of puzzle elements and skill. So why the divide? What was it in our cultures or something which made the exact same game look, feel and play differently to us?
I can't speak for anyone other than myself, but I just loved the fact that Repton stayed in the centre and the maze moved around him. Also I liked the big sprites, the walking animation, the sounds, the music, and I liked the idea of solving puzzles rather than simple arcade action. I still do!

When Repton 3 came out I was really into designing my own characters and levels, for me that was just the icing on the cake.

The one thing I never liked was the fungus! Too random for my taste ;)

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:27 am

Commie_User wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:25 am
Andrew_Waite wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 1:37 am
I guess before we get too critical of what these folks did 35 years ago......
I say Amen to that. The computer scene was still taking form back then, so many educated guesses and tempting mirages ended in failure. I think the console makers cleaned up because the machines were cheaper and more straightforward for parents while games were generally bigger, better and with generally superior physics. It was just progress. Who wanted, by 1987 odd, either another dated 8 bit micro to confuse the mix or one of the new 16 bits which few could afford or find enough use for?

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Andrew_Waite » Mon Jan 07, 2019 6:17 pm

Commie_User wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:25 am
Andrew_Waite wrote:
Sun Jan 06, 2019 1:37 am
I guess before we get too critical of what these folks did 35 years ago......
I say Amen to that. The computer scene was still taking form back then, so many educated guesses and tempting mirages ended in failure. I think the console makers cleaned up because the machines were cheaper and more straightforward for parents while games were generally bigger, better and with generally superior physics. It was just progress. Who wanted, by 1987 odd, either another dated 8 bit micro to confuse the mix or one of the new 16 bits which few could afford or find enough use for?
Thinking back to what I used my Electron for BITD, for O-Level Computer Science I connected temperature sensors to the ADC of the PLUS-1, whilst controlling relays through Darlington drivers connected to the printer port, all with BBC BASIC. This would not have been possible on a C64 with its lousy BASIC and OS. I wrote the report in Acornsoft View on the Electron using 80 column text that the C64 did not have, and took my work to school on floppy disks to run on the BBCs. C64 floppy drives were expensive and very slow. So I guess the Electron was the superior machine for me and what I was interested in back then. Pity about the missing 4 1x64kbit memory chips that would have made the data bus to RAM in the Elk 8-bits wide though.
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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by RobC » Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:40 pm

Andrew_Waite wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 6:17 pm
Thinking back to what I used my Electron for BITD, for O-Level Computer Science I connected temperature sensors to the ADC of the PLUS-1, whilst controlling relays through Darlington drivers connected to the printer port, all with BBC BASIC. This would not have been possible on a C64 with its lousy BASIC and OS. I wrote the report in Acornsoft View on the Electron using 80 column text that the C64 did not have, and took my work to school on floppy disks to run on the BBCs. C64 floppy drives were expensive and very slow. So I guess the Electron was the superior machine for me and what I was interested in back then. Pity about the missing 4 1x64kbit memory chips that would have made the data bus to RAM in the Elk 8-bits wide though.
I think these are really good points as these features of the Elk are often overlooked. Seen only as a games machine, it has some shortcomings (but also lots of great games as anyone with one of Dave H's mega cartridges will testify).

However, I don't think Acorn were looking to produce a games machine - the Electron is still a serious hobbyist machine albeit in a cut-down, reduced cost form. It has an excellent BASIC and OS, a good keyboard and can do a proper 80 column display. It makes a good wordprocessor and a superb front-end for a TUBE system.

This marks it out as a different type of machine from the C64 or Spectrum (although Sinclair seemingly wanted his machine to be seen as a serious computer). Unfortunately, Acorn missed the crucial Christmas 1983 period when education and learning about computers was still a high priority. By the time Acorn was able to produce it in sufficient numbers, the sub-£200 market was mostly just looking for something the kids could play games on.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by BigEd » Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:50 pm

Yes, Acorn saw computers as being for computing. I do too. But it seems the word 'computer' has changed its meaning, at least for some:
Upton recalls a bonfire party in 2007 where an 11-year-old boy told him he wanted to be an electrical engineer:
"I said, 'Oh, what computer have you got?'. He said, 'I've got a Nintendo Wii'. And there was just that awful feeling about there being a kid who was excited, a kid who was showing concrete interest in our profession, and who didn't have access to a programmable computer, a computer of any sort. He just had a games console."

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:36 pm

BigEd wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:50 pm
And there was just that awful feeling about there being a kid who was excited, a kid who was showing concrete interest in our profession, and who didn't have access to a programmable computer, a computer of any sort. He just had a games console."
[/quote]

That's not necessarily new. Back when Atari led the charge in video game consoles - people weren't certain how to approach anything else outside work or school - it took Commodore's idea in America to use William Shatner to push the Vic 20's merits, what with it's real keyboard and everything. And people have access to programmable computers these days, whether or not they've got one of their own to actually handle.

Actually, that's not conceptually bad now. With game consoles and PCs somewhat merging in the leisure area, today's kids may have a good few ideas on the services they want their computers to provide. Especially if they have a good market brain.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Commie_User » Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:43 pm

Andrew_Waite wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 6:17 pm
Thinking back to what I used my Electron for BITD, for O-Level Computer Science I connected temperature sensors to the ADC of the PLUS-1, whilst controlling relays........
Did you get yours when it was new or when Olivetti let them sell for a little more than a pack of Kia Oras and an armful of crisps?

But that's the thing again with the Electron. Its strengths were in the hobby and academic area but I don't recall seeing Acorn User or anyone else in advertising push any experiments. (Save in competitions of kids to get the worst case of RSI through typing in screeds of BASIC.)

It was affordable but a lot of light was hidden under its bushel.

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Re: Why was Repton so loved by BBC users yet so disliked by the Commies?

Post by Rich Talbot-Watkins » Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:47 pm

Yeah, my take on this is that Repton was just a style of game which worked incredibly well on the Beeb hardware, given its hardware scrolling capabilities, which is probably also why there were a good few games of a similar style (Ravenskull, Pipeline, Clogger...).

This style conversely didn't lend itself so well to the C64 with its hardware sprites and single pixel scrolling. Having seen C64 Repton 3 on YouTube, the software scrolling is a bit rubbish, the visible editor widgets during the game itself are a bit... rubbish... and the music's just a straight port of the Beeb tune, instead of getting the best out of the SID - it's a pretty underwhelming effort so I'm not surprised it wasn't really loved.

I personally loved the original Repton on the Beeb. The big graphics, the bold colours, the LOUD music and the full screen scrolling just seemed really special to my young eyes. And I was quite good at it as well, which helped!

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