Microcomputer magazines - the early years

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fuzzel
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Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by fuzzel » Thu Mar 23, 2017 9:37 pm

The BBC micro came out in December 1981 but the first magazine dedicated to the machine didn't come out until July 1982 (Acorn User).
Does anyone know of any general computer magazines which were around at the time, if they did a special on the beeb's launch that would definitely
be worth a read.
While I'm on the subject of micro magazines, which was the first UK magazine dedicated to micros?

paulb
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by paulb » Thu Mar 23, 2017 10:55 pm

There are magazine articles in the documents section on Chris's Acorns, but early Personal Computer World articles don't appear to be there (from a quick glance), and magazines like Byte certainly covered the Beeb to some degree.

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flaxcottage
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by flaxcottage » Thu Mar 23, 2017 11:29 pm

Computing Today magazine began in 1979.

The April 1981 edition featured the Atom and a world exclusive revelation of the BBC micro.

June 1981 featured the BBC software specification. It also reviewed the ZX81.

February 1982 had a feature on the BBC Computer Program

It wasn't until March 1982 that Computing Today reviewed the BBC micro.
- John

Why do I keep collecting Acorn gear? I'm going to need a considerably bigger man-cave. :?


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hoglet
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by hoglet » Fri Mar 24, 2017 7:01 am

The Your Computer magazines (all of them I think) are available on archive.org:
https://archive.org/details/your-comput ... &sort=date

The Computing Today and Personal Computer World magazines of that era are not yet available.

But you can read the BBC Micro reviews here:
http://www.stairwaytohell.com/articles/

Dave

fuzzel
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by fuzzel » Fri Mar 24, 2017 2:12 pm

Thanks for the comments everyone. I think I'll download Your Computer for articles / adverts relating to the beeb's early days and keep my eye out on ebay for 1978-1982 editions of Personal Computer World.

Commie_User
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by Commie_User » Mon Mar 27, 2017 10:26 am

On that Your Computer cover, why does the BBC PSU and speaker look funkier than mine?

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ctr
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by ctr » Tue Mar 28, 2017 3:24 pm

Commie_User wrote:On that Your Computer cover, why does the BBC PSU and speaker look funkier than mine?
It looks like they've removed the speaker and fitted it into the top of the PSU! But I think I must be misinterpreting it.

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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by RobC » Tue Mar 28, 2017 3:54 pm

ctr wrote:
Commie_User wrote:On that Your Computer cover, why does the BBC PSU and speaker look funkier than mine?
It looks like they've removed the speaker and fitted it into the top of the PSU! But I think I must be misinterpreting it.
It's the early linear PSU rather than the later (and far more common) switched-mode design. Apparently, the BBC specified that the Beeb must have a linear PSU until Acorn convinced them otherwise...

The white speaker housing also looks to be an early design but, unlike the linear PSU, I've not seen or owned one like that.

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algenon_iii
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by algenon_iii » Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:04 pm

Personal Computer News

http://www.acornelectron.co.uk/mags/pcn/top_lvl.html

Some scans seem to be missing, like the electron and Torch BBC Unix front covers :( and dedicated PCN site is down.

One set of scans that is there is the "Acorn quits home computing" front cover about the demise of the electron http://www.acornelectron.co.uk/mags/pcn ... cn101.html

Chinnyvision on youtube has a look into a few old issues of PCN (the charts show just how well the beeb and electron sold) but no link to where he got the scans from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JoRxU6xwqQ

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danielj
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by danielj » Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:08 pm

RobC wrote:
The white speaker housing also looks to be an early design but, unlike the linear PSU, I've not seen or owned one like that.
Yup - it's a really early design. If you look closely the motherboard is an issue 1.

d.

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danielj
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by danielj » Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:31 pm

This little gem is in the review of the Atom word processor in Your Computer (just after the beeb review):
Novel feature
The Atom word processor, WordPack, costs
£30 including VAT and is available from
Acornsoft, Leasalink and several other dealers.
It is a 24-pin ROM which fits into the spare
utilities socket provided on even the minimal
SK-24 Atom board. A novel feature is that the
top of the ROM has a small transparent
window through which you can see the chip.
I will say no more.

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Richard Russell
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Re: Microcomputer magazines - the early years

Post by Richard Russell » Tue Mar 28, 2017 8:28 pm

RobC wrote:Apparently, the BBC specified that the Beeb must have a linear PSU
That might have been me! Certainly there was a feeling at the time that SMPS's were unreliable. The first I ever designed expired with a loud bang when my boss insisted on repeatedly shorting the output. It must have had such an impact on me that to this day I can remember the transistor that failed: STA9364.

Richard.

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