Blind Accessible Adventure Games on the BBC Micro

discuss text & graphic adventures for Acorns. level 9, robico & epic led this field
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OneSwitch
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Blind Accessible Adventure Games on the BBC Micro

Post by OneSwitch » Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:01 am

I've heard several people talk about how they used text to speech output to play adventure games on the BBC Micro, such as Level 9's Lords of Time.

It seems likely that people were using a method of piping the text output directly to an external speech synthesiser.

I've opened up some discussion on this here: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16483.

My hope is to preserve some of this software and hardware, if any still exists. If it doesn't my hope is that someone might be able to recreate a screen-reader using a phoneme based speech ROM, for use in emulators. It would need to work with Lords of Time and other text-only text adventures.

If anyone can help, please do! :)

The Apple II has some great preservation work going on for blind accessible games: http://www.bluegrasspals.com/messapple/

It would be a shame if all the BBC Micro stuff is lost in time, beyond anecdotal memories.
Last edited by OneSwitch on Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

OneSwitch
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Re: Blind Accessible Adventure Games on the BBC Micro

Post by OneSwitch » Thu Feb 14, 2019 8:01 am

As a side note, just heard of one blind player who loved Football Manager using text to speech on a BBC Micro.

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richardtoohey
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Re: Blind Accessible Adventure Games on the BBC Micro

Post by richardtoohey » Fri Feb 15, 2019 3:02 am

Could you do this by intercepting the VDU vector and building up words I wonder ... :-k

So on entry to the routine, if A-Z a-z then store in word buffer. If punctuation like space, comma or full stop, send word buffer to speech synth and clear word buffer. Regardless of whether storing in the buffer or not, you pass onto the original VDU routine so the text will still be displayed on-screen.

Can't recall if there's separate vectors for VDU input/output.

Might have a play to see if I can do it with Computer Concepts Speech! That will use too much RAM but as a proof-of-concept ...
Last edited by richardtoohey on Fri Feb 15, 2019 3:03 am, edited 1 time in total.

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