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jonb
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3D printing advice

Post by jonb » Wed May 06, 2020 7:10 pm

Hi

I’m thinking of scoring a 3D printer. Initial selection is a Creality Ender 3 Pro which can be got from Bangood for under £200. But... Is it any good?

I’ve never bought from there before, is it likely to be genuine or fake? What is “genuine”? I’ve seen many Ender 3 printers with different brand names on Amazon. What’s going on, is it open sourced hardware?

Next, 3D design. I’m aware that I have a learning curve ahead, but I’m thinking TinkerCAD for design and Cura for slicing. Anyone have experience of these or better suggestions?

Sorry about the open ended questions. I’ve seen a bunch of youtoobz and my head’s spinning a bit!

Any advice or stories welcome!

Cheers
JonB

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scruss
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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by scruss » Thu May 07, 2020 12:36 am

Ender 3's a perfectly good first printer. I have one. There are a few things I'd upgrade on it, not least the dodgy firmware it ships with. It's perfectly okay, though. I think I've written about it plenty elsewhere here.

If you can't find a local reseller (more expensive, but someone to handle warranty), https://www.creality3dofficial.com/ is the official site. Banggood may be knockoffs/seconds.

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Elminster
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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Sat May 09, 2020 10:42 am

Jon asked if I could add my experience of knowing nothing about 3rd printers before cov19 to where I am now.

First off I would subscribe to channels on you tube like teaching tech, makers muse, cnc kitchen, 3D printer nerds, Thomas sanladerer, Chep, Chris Riley to name but a few. There are also a couple of good podcasts like , and the Meltzone and 3D printing today. And I assume you have already found the websites and groups for repeal, all3d etc.

So I have decided to stick with the Huxley I have but heavily modify it. Which puts me in a similar boat to if you buy an Ender 3, I.e. after a few weeks you will want to modify it. The Ender 3 is a great printer for the money but you have to be a bit lucky and the quality on some of them can vary, and nearly all of them have a warped bed. So you could be lucky and get one that is fine. Personally I would wait for the v2, but I already have a printer, if you need one sooner then I would go for the pro with its mean well psu.

Software wise I dumped all the free slicers and went with Simplify3d (as did Dave I believe), as it was just so much easier to use and gave better prints than the free options, but I would suggest seeing if you can get what you want from something,like Cura before you spend money.

3D software wise I went down the full 3D modelling rote with Blender. Mainly because it works on Linux, doesn’t need a web connecting and has a nice interface. But it is a pig to learn. Most people seem to go from Tinkercad and then use fusion 360 personal edition for harder stuff. I would have gone the fusion360 route if it was available on Linux (I didn’t want to faff with VMs).

Also I would say a raspberry pi with octaprint and a camera are a must, that way you don’t need to a pc connected. I have simplify3d setup so it slices the print and automatically sends it to octaprint server.

As to my Huxley, I have a 150x150 silicone heater, a 165x165 tooled aluminium plate arriving soon, not to mention new E3d hotend and extruder, a skr1.4, tft3.5 and tmc2209 drivers and a bltouch. Just because it is something to do .... it already has a new x carriage, a new part cooling fan and bracket, quieter hotend fan, new z stop bracket design, increased Z axis clearance. Etc. I had to design and print a bracket for the Titan extruder as none existed for the Huxley. Ditto for bracket for the skr. I also had to design a hotend shim.

So basically Ender 3 might become your hobby, where as spending more on something like a Prusa i3 mk3s then he printer will just be a tool as it already does everything you need.

Hope that helps from my 6 weeks of printer learning.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Sat May 09, 2020 10:46 am

P.S.

I had very specific reasons for using Blender, it is a pig to learn. I would recommend sticking with Tinkercad and then moving to fusion360 or freecad etc. When ready.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Sat May 09, 2020 1:52 pm

To answer the rest of your questions. Yes most stuff around the reprap.org systems are open source. So Creality sell there printer based off open source designs and firmware. The propriety ones are usually over £1k. Look up Adrian Bowyer https://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap and the reprap movement for more info. You can get £100 eBay/banggood printers, often based around the i2 but they are basically crap, while you can make them work you would need to put in effort to make them work. As Scruss said get it from the official shop or somewhere like jake3d (although they are sold out).

So if you see a cloned E3d hotend or extruder, that is fine as it is open source design (Although I think they were forced down this route), if you see a cloned bltouch, that is not fine as that is not open source.

https://e3d-online.com/blog/2017/04/13/gpl/

Also what do you want to print. Generally for retro the filament type 3D printers are best, but if you were doing miniatures, jewellery etc then you can’t beat a resin based 3D printer. But they are very messy.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by daveejhitchins » Sun May 10, 2020 9:52 am

Elminster wrote:
Sat May 09, 2020 10:42 am
As to my Huxley, I have a 150x150 silicone heater, a 165x165 tooled aluminium plate arriving soon, not to mention new E3d hotend and extruder, a skr1.4, tft3.5 and tmc2209 drivers and a bltouch. Just because it is something to do .... it already has a new x carriage, a new part cooling fan and bracket, quieter hotend fan, new z stop bracket design, increased Z axis clearance. Etc. I had to design and print a bracket for the Titan extruder as none existed for the Huxley. Ditto for bracket for the skr. I also had to design a hotend shim.
Trigger's broom? :lol:

Dave H :D

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Elminster
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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Sun May 10, 2020 10:42 am

They self replicate. Bit like gremlins, by the end of the week you have 9 of the and then they turn nasty. Had to swap out the first x carriage, if you had been doing ABS for a while the bearing would slip out of the carriage and the hotend would crash into the model, newer version is a tighter fit and hs the cutout at the back for parts fan.

Also I saw the CR 6 is now up on Kickstarter (for advertising/preorder purposes) for aug/sept delivery. That looks like a contender to beat the Ender 3 as the go to cheap printer. Same company of course.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/10 ... inter-kit/

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by scruss » Sun May 10, 2020 8:40 pm

Elminster wrote:
Sat May 09, 2020 10:42 am

So I have decided to stick with the Huxley I have but heavily modify it. Which puts me in a similar boat to if you buy an Ender 3, I.e. after a few weeks you will want to modify it.
Not necessarily. I've had mine since November 2018. All I've done to it is:
  1. replaced the firmware. This is a safety thing. The stock Ender firmware didn't check for overheating. I don't know if they've changed that yet. The great thing about Marlin firmware is that it doesn't beep when you use the controls. It also allows silliness like this.
  2. put in a metal extruder gear; about $10. The original plastic one is okay, but makes changing filament harder than it needs to be.
  3. printed a couple of small things: bowden tube clips and a cable management guide.
The Ender 3, like most printers, is also open source, so these modifications are easy to do. It's a constant balance between printing useful things and printing upgrades. I lean towards the former.
… nearly all of them have a warped bed.
I'd say some of them might have a warped bed. Mine doesn't or at least, it's not warped enough to care about.
Software wise I dumped all the free slicers and went with Simplify3d
We tried that at work. Its slicing was significantly worse than Cura, and the resulting print files were much slower than PrusaSlicer. PrusaSlicer supports the Ender 3 and gives great results.

It's funny: when one is very new to 3d printing, you spend ages fiddling with settings. Now I just go with defaults pretty much all the time and I get good results.
As to my Huxley, I have a 150x150 silicone heater, a 165x165 tooled aluminium plate …
That must have set you back a bit. Almost as much as a Prusa Mini …
So basically Ender 3 might become your hobby, where as spending more on something like a Prusa i3 mk3s then he printer will just be a tool as it already does everything you need.
I have an I3 MK3s. Yeah, it's better (faster, quieter, bigger bed, easier filament change, slightly better print quality) than the Ender 3, but it's 4× the price. Building the Prusa kit is horrible. The Ender 3 is about 30 minutes. The new Prusas we've been getting for work have some major quality control issues: one assembled unit had the heater block turned 90° and whoever assembled it at the factory just gave up on the bits that were supposed to go around the hot end and left them loose in the box.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Sun May 10, 2020 10:25 pm

Hopefully all the quotes in the right place.
scruss wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 8:40 pm
Elminster wrote:
Sat May 09, 2020 10:42 am

So I have decided to stick with the Huxley I have but heavily modify it. Which puts me in a similar boat to if you buy an Ender 3, I.e. after a few weeks you will want to modify it.
Not necessarily. I've had mine since November 2018. All I've done to it is:
  1. replaced the firmware. This is a safety thing. The stock Ender firmware didn't check for overheating. I don't know if they've changed that yet. The great thing about Marlin firmware is that it doesn't beep when you use the controls. It also allows silliness like this.
  2. put in a metal extruder gear; about $10. The original plastic one is okay, but makes changing filament harder than it needs to be.
  3. printed a couple of small things: bowden tube clips and a cable management guide.
The Ender 3, like most printers, is also open source, so these modifications are easy to do. It's a constant balance between printing useful things and printing upgrades. I lean towards the former.
… nearly all of them have a warped bed.
I'd say some of them might have a warped bed. Mine doesn't or at least, it's not warped enough to care about.
But these are all commonly reported issues on the Ender 3 that will catch beginners out. Remember you aren't a beginner :D The point is if you know about these issues you are forewarned. Some how don't mind fixing issues with the printer and others who will just send it back. I wouldn't have an issue with those but I am just pointing them out. It is hard to judge with these issue as lots of people moan about them in the forums, but people who dont have them don't mention them. I know the thermal runaway issue is fixed from factory, but I believe extruder fatigue and bouncing Bowden tubes are still an issue. (Hopefully fixed on the Ender 3 V2, not seen a review for that yet).

Software wise I dumped all the free slicers and went with Simplify3d
We tried that at work. Its slicing was significantly worse than Cura, and the resulting print files were much slower than PrusaSlicer. PrusaSlicer supports the Ender 3 and gives great results.

It's funny: when one is very new to 3d printing, you spend ages fiddling with settings. Now I just go with defaults pretty much all the time and I get good results.
I think it is impossible to say, which people will get best results from, which is why I said try the free Cura first. There are a lot of Enders users who use Cura, less use Simplify3D because it costs money (but assume must get better results than Cura or would not pay for it). But I agree about the settings, once dialled in you wonder why you ever had issues.
As to my Huxley, I have a 150x150 silicone heater, a 165x165 tooled aluminium plate …
That must have set you back a bit. Almost as much as a Prusa Mini …
The aluminium plate or the heating pad? Total costs for both with postage was about £60. (I just had the aluminium cut to size in the UK, it isnt that expensive).
So basically Ender 3 might become your hobby, where as spending more on something like a Prusa i3 mk3s then he printer will just be a tool as it already does everything you need.
I have an I3 MK3s. Yeah, it's better (faster, quieter, bigger bed, easier filament change, slightly better print quality) than the Ender 3, but it's 4× the price. Building the Prusa kit is horrible. The Ender 3 is about 30 minutes. The new Prusas we've been getting for work have some major quality control issues: one assembled unit had the heater block turned 90° and whoever assembled it at the factory just gave up on the bits that were supposed to go around the hot end and left them loose in the box.
The CR6 SE is even quicker to put together.... Unless you take into account you need to wait 3 or 4 months for it to start delivery.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by scruss » Mon May 11, 2020 3:11 am

But I agree about the settings, once dialled in you wonder why you ever had issues.
Pretty much all dialling in is a waste of time. Use the out of the box settings. They'll be just as good as anything you've fiddled with, is what I was trying to say.

For us, Simplify3D was under-extruding so much that prints would delaminate. It was a complete waste of money.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Mon May 11, 2020 9:02 am

scruss wrote:
Mon May 11, 2020 3:11 am
But I agree about the settings, once dialled in you wonder why you ever had issues.
Pretty much all dialling in is a waste of time. Use the out of the box settings. They'll be just as good as anything you've fiddled with, is what I was trying to say.

For us, Simplify3D was under-extruding so much that prints would delaminate. It was a complete waste of money.
With the Ender that is probably true. I can only give my experiences With the Huxley, and there wasn’t any settings in anything but slic3r, and that was just not giving anything useful even with the Huxley settings.


Did Simply3d not do the money back trial at the time? If Simply3d was under extruding why didn’t you just change it? I tweaked the settings in Simply3d to slightly reduce the over extrusion (although later I fixed in firmware and reset the slicer settings). But then due to no settings I spent days setting up simply 3D and working out what ever setting did, and before that days fidderling with slic3r and Cura. I guess my experiences with slicing are going to be completely different from most as settings for my printer are rarely included my default. So none of this paragraph is relevant to Jonb really.

Edit: I suspect Cura, Simply3d, Slic3r etc. Is just another which is better MacOS, Windows or Linux type question. I think it is best to just try them, starting with the free ones, and if Cura does works for them you have saved loads. Rumour is that simplify3D 5 is due out and is a major change, of course that was preCov19.

Edit2: summary for Jonb of my opinions. I still think that best printer for a beginner tinker is Ender3 Pro or V2. Beginner who doesn’t want to tinker, and doesn’t mind waiting and spending a bit more the CR6 SE is looking very good. And if loads of cash (and get the prebuilt-ish kit) then the Prusa i3, again the mk4 was due out this year but who knows now. That is all from no experience with any of them and just, seemingly, thousands of hours of YouTube and forums! So I caveat anything I say with it could be completely wrong. And start with Cura & Tinkercad, but try all the slicers and 3D modellers when you get time, experience to see what suits and what meets requirements etc. There isn’t really a answer that suits all.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by scruss » Mon May 11, 2020 1:24 pm

No, there wasn't a refund available on Simplify at the time. This was a couple of years ago. Our job is to get reliable 3D designs out to people who need them, and Simplify was too much expense and uncertainty. We want print and go, and favour strength over looks (up to a point). IIRC - it was a remote colleague who used Simplify - it was under-extruding by weight, not by external appearance. If a printed part's under weight, it's under strength. We were also printing in ABS at the time, which is just so much nope these days.

I'd maybe caution against recommending printers that aren't yet released. The new Creality machine does promise lovely things, but it could have teething problems. The best printer is one you can see in person and talk to users before buying, and kickstarters don't do that.

[The ultimate no-tinkering printer I've used is the Dremel 3D45. Designed for corporate use, it's an appliance: filament and data go in, objects come out. It's ridiculously expensive, and only works with Dremel's proprietary extortionate filament (small reels, RFID locked). But: a) got PETG filament loaded but your model's sliced for PLA? No problem, the 3D45 adjusts temperature and feed rate of the gcode for the material that's loaded; b) Something breaks? Call or email Dremel. A replacement's in the mail that day, no charge. It's basically magic, but you pay for it.]

Seeing jonb's thread on the Superbrain restoration: that case isn't going to be 3d printable at home, affordably any time soon. It's huge and encloses massive volumes. The tooling for the original must've been unbelievably expensive.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by tricky » Mon May 11, 2020 1:43 pm

Retro Man Cave just bought an Ender 3 Pro and has done a video about assembling it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rglWxXSrHiA

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by jonb » Mon May 11, 2020 4:16 pm

scruss wrote:Seeing jonb's thread on the Superbrain restoration: that case isn't going to be 3d printable at home, affordably any time soon. It's huge and encloses massive volumes. The tooling for the original must've been unbelievably expensive.
I agree it can't be 3d printed in one go, but in sections? Maybe. I thought I could print a frame in pieces that has all the top edge compound curves, then infill with ply. It's going to be filled an painted anyway, to match the original. On the other hand... https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... sVpmf0nIgC ..but it's 500x800mm and that is 100mm too small (need 600x800). So the frame would need to be modified, but it looks tall enough (I'd need about 300mm).

What's exciting here is the idea of using a tool (smaller 3d printer) to craft a better tool (bigger 3d printer), kind of like Acorn using a Beeb to design the ARM processor.

Another option might be to use plaster of Paris to make a mould of the original, and then use a fibreglass lay up to get the shape? Messy but doable?
scruss wrote:The great thing about Marlin firmware is that it doesn't beep when you use the controls. It also allows silliness like this.
I really hate that beepy racket. I have a super LG direct drive washing machine, really whizzy, dead quiet, huge capacity, but it plays that damned stupid tune every time the wash ends. Grrr... :D

@Tricky: yeah, saw it - thanks for the link. Doesn't say much though, other than it's easy to use (ish).

@Elminster: You have the nail on the head as it were. I've seen videos from many of those channels but have not yet found a forum that looks active enough. What do you suggest? I have the same thoughts re: Ender 3 V2 vs. CR 6 SE. Missed the early bird offers, so will wait until it comes out and see what the reviews say. Ender 3 V2 already has the quiet board fitted, a definite plus for me, and some other things that they copied from the community (spool feed knob, belt tension adjusters, tool drawer). Mechanism appears to be only a very small increment from the 3 Pro (if at all). They seem to have propagated a lot of stuff that people don't care for, like the plastic feeder for example. And what type of extruder is under that pretty little plastic shroud? Same as the Pro, I'll warrant. Only other thing is the colour screen, but it's not touch (gosh what a missed opportunity). Yes, upgradable, but at extra cost. And no magnetic base.... hmm. Would a base bought from Creality stick to it? (Has it got a steel platform?).

Questions, questions!

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by BigEd » Mon May 11, 2020 4:58 pm

(I think there's a large and active community at https://forum.makerforums.info/ - here's a search term that might be useful)

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Mon May 11, 2020 6:38 pm

BigEd wrote:
Mon May 11, 2020 4:58 pm
(I think there's a large and active community at https://forum.makerforums.info/ - here's a search term that might be useful)
Could be worth a look. Not come across a ‘star dot’ like forum for 3D printer yet. Lots of Facebook, Reddit and thingiverse groups but not reallly the same.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Mon May 11, 2020 6:44 pm

scruss wrote:
Mon May 11, 2020 1:24 pm

I'd maybe caution against recommending printers that aren't yet released. The new Creality machine does promise lovely things, but it could have teething problems. The best printer is one you can see in person and talk to users before buying, and kickstarters don't do that
No teall6 a real Kickstarter. More of a publicity stunt, I believe they are going for highest funded Kickstarter ever. They made the target in 9 mins. And the flash sales went as quickly.

I did actually back it already. I plan for the CR6 to be the ‘don’t need to touch and large prints’, and the Huxley as the tinkering machine. And if the bed is warped (under the glass) I already have a spare 235mm tool aluminium plate spare (I had to make the minimum order value for the plate for the Huxley).

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Mon May 11, 2020 7:08 pm

jonb wrote:
Mon May 11, 2020 4:16 pm
scruss wrote:Seeing jonb's thread on the Superbrain restoration: that case isn't going to be 3d printable at home, affordably any time soon. It's huge and encloses massive volumes. The tooling for the original must've been unbelievably expensive.
I agree it can't be 3d printed in one go, but in sections? Maybe. I thought I could print a frame in pieces that has all the top edge compound curves, then infill with ply. It's going to be filled an painted anyway, to match the original. On the other hand... https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... sVpmf0nIgC ..but it's 500x800mm and that is 100mm too small (need 600x800). So the frame would need to be modified, but it looks tall enough (I'd need about 300mm).
They also do the x/y expansion kits for Ender 3, but would still to small and kits cost more than the original printer.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Mon May 11, 2020 7:10 pm

tricky wrote:
Mon May 11, 2020 1:43 pm
Retro Man Cave just bought an Ender 3 Pro and has done a video about assembling it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rglWxXSrHiA
I watched that as well, not because of printer, but just because I follow the channel anyway. That was definitely a no issue built a good advert for the Ender3.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by scruss » Mon May 11, 2020 11:44 pm

If you're looking for forums, Thingiverse has lots. They're a bit hidden, but they're only about 3d printing.

Surprisingly, Reddit's /r/ender3 isn't just terrible. They have some decent moderation.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Tue May 12, 2020 12:13 am

The r/3Dprinting and r/FixMyPrint , r/octoprint and r/reprap groups are reasonably active as well. Facebook has group overload, every man and his dog has started a 3rd printing group, and also not very searchable. Facebook groups always seem to be somewhere between a fourm and discord group.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Wed May 13, 2020 9:44 am

Coincidence? Teaching Tech you tube channel just did a video on Simply3d be Cura vs Prusaslicer. Unusual to get up to date videos at the moment as no Simply3d updates for 18 months.

https://youtu.be/-DSrAmI1vjk

The conclusion is basically unless an all signing all dancing Simply3d version gets released (been promised for over a year) imminently go with Cura which has caught up in features and is free.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Thu May 14, 2020 9:30 am

And 3rd printing nerd’s unboxing and setup of a preproduction CR6 SE.

Looks promising if they can get there quality control and software all ironed out. Potential for a plug and play machine with limited to no knowledge of printers required (well until it goes wrong anyway).


https://youtu.be/OHLlZ39sLCo

The most amusing bit was him not being able to find the bolts, which were featured in one of the other you tubers videos.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by jonb » Thu May 14, 2020 1:46 pm

Just watched that and spent most of my time yelling at the screen "JUST GET TO THE POINT ALREADY!"

The print they did looked pretty good, not that they showed many close ups. Why didn't they print a Benchy? Or at least, test their little column with a micrometer? As he said, it's promising...

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by jonb » Thu May 14, 2020 1:59 pm

Dagnammit. After reviewing Naomi Wu's video again and taking another look at the prints she got I've just pulled the trigger on the CR-6 SE. Yes, looking AT THE PRINTS, mark you. Not an euphemism!

Now the long wait begins...

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by scruss » Thu May 14, 2020 3:41 pm

A Benchy is only a very superficial test of a 3D printer. It shows off how well your printer can do shells and bridging. Even a fairly terrible printer can do nice shells if you slow it down enough.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by jonb » Thu May 14, 2020 4:04 pm

Fair enough, scruss. But Wu's video also shows a 3D printed skull and a torture test (designed by that guy on Maker's Muse) and they both looked pretty exceptional to my (admittedly, novice) eyes.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Thu May 14, 2020 5:58 pm

jonb wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 4:04 pm
Fair enough, scruss. But Wu's video also shows a 3D printed skull and a torture test (designed by that guy on Maker's Muse) and they both looked pretty exceptional to my (admittedly, novice) eyes.
Bear in mind I beIive she is sponsored by Creality. Hence I only posted 3D nerd’s.

With3d nerds you are meant to put in comments what you want him to print in full review.

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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by jonb » Thu May 14, 2020 7:54 pm

Too late, Elminster I've "pledged". Oh by the way, the Kickstarter page is linking to the 3d nerds review as well.

I think it'll be OK. The Ender 3 Pro is the benchmark for printers in this bracket and this has some really neat features that would have cost quite a bit of money to retro fit to an Ender 3. Auto levelling, quiet board with better stepper drivers, colour touch screen, filament sensor, belt tensioners and probably a host of other small improvements. Same there's no magnetic bed, though. Hmm, it costs about £17 so not a terrible issue.

Main issue here is the wait. I might get it by September! But then, plenty of time to learn how to model.

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Elminster
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Re: 3D printing advice

Post by Elminster » Thu May 14, 2020 8:49 pm

jonb wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 7:54 pm
Too late, Elminster I've "pledged". Oh by the way, the Kickstarter page is linking to the 3d nerds review as well.

I think it'll be OK. The Ender 3 Pro is the benchmark for printers in this bracket and this has some really neat features that would have cost quite a bit of money to retro fit to an Ender 3. Auto levelling, quiet board with better stepper drivers, colour touch screen, filament sensor, belt tensioners and probably a host of other small improvements. Same there's no magnetic bed, though. Hmm, it costs about £17 so not a terrible issue.

Main issue here is the wait. I might get it by September! But then, plenty of time to learn how to model.
I think I mentioned above I already backed it awhile ago. Although missed the flash price as that went in minutes. Still on same tier as you are though I should think.

The only reason I can think they went for glass over flexi steel is it hides a warped aluminium bed. I have a spare 235x235 aluminium tool plate I could swap for the glass and put the flexi steel on that. Only because the aluminium might distribute heat better. Will see, will give the glass a go first. Currently I print on Kapton tape so can’t be worse than that. (I have another aluminium plate and a whambam flexi plate to upgrade that to at some point)

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