Beeb Spotting

on-topic Acorn-related news and discussions not covered by the other forums
User avatar
davidb
Posts: 1898
Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2007 10:11 pm
Contact:

Beeb Spotting

Postby davidb » Sun Jan 19, 2014 10:29 pm

Went to the Oslo Maker Faire today at the Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology and saw this in the museum's music exhibition. The key piece of hardware - the ordinary-looking box sitting between the Beeb and the floppy drive - is a UMI 2B sequencer, and is apparently only one of four to come to Norway, so LOLRARE for Norwegians. ;)

I don't know if the unit works these days - it's an unpowered exhibit. Some of the older exhibits have recordings you can listen to.
Attachments
DSCF5190r.jpg
BBC Micro at the Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology.

User avatar
davidb
Posts: 1898
Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2007 10:11 pm
Contact:

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby davidb » Wed Mar 01, 2017 12:02 pm

Just adding a couple more old photos and linking back to the other thread.

The text of the exhibit's description reads as follows (Norwegian then English):
UMI 2B - musikkprogrammering med datamaskin anno 1984

På begynnelsen av 1980-tallet ble MIDI - Musical Instrument Digital Interface - laget for å gi en felles standard for å kople digitale instrumenter sammen med hverandre og også opp mot datamaskiner. UMI-systemet var et av de første systemene for MIDI-programmering med datamaskin, og dette eksemplaret ble kjøpt i London av Arne Schei. Totalt ble det kjøpt ca. fire slike systemer til Norge. Utstyret var dyrt, og man måtte ha BBC-maskinen i tillegg.

UMI-systemet ble utviklet av musikeren Lynton Naiff og solgt gjennom London Rock Shop. Vince Clarke (Erasure, Depeche Mode) er en av de mest profilerte UMI-brukerne og brukte den inntil nylig. Flere av de store engelske plateproduksjonene på 1980-tallet ble gjort med UMI. Mesteparten av a-has debutalbum Hunting High and Low ble programmert med UMI.

Med UMI'en kunne man programmere en rekke synther og trommemaskiner til å spille sammen, og systemet var svært presist og lett å bruke. Man kunne blant annet velge mellom å spille inn i «realtime» eller få utjevnet opptaket maskinpresist.

NTM 2B113 Sequencer interface og datamaskin, 1984-85. Gitt av Arne Schei


UMI 2B - Computer Music Programming in 1984

In the early 1980s MIDI - Musical Instrument Digital Interface was invented in order to establish a common standard for connecting digital instruments with each other and with computers. The UMI sequencer was one of the first systems designed for MIDI programming with a computer, and this one was purchased in London by Arne Schei. A total of four such systems were brought to Norway. This equipment was expensive, and in addition a BBC computer was needed in order to run it.

The UMI sequencer was developed by musician Lynton Naiff, and was sold by the London Rock Shop. Vince Clarke (Erasure, Depeche Mode) is one of the most well-known UMI enthusiasts, and actually used it until quite recently. Many of the major English record productions of the 1980s were programmed with UMI, including much of a-ha's debut album, Hunting High and Low.

With UMI a number of synths and drum machines could be programmed to play together, and the system was extremely precise and easy to use. One of its advantages was that the user could decide whether to record in "real time" or equalise the recording with machine—like precision.

NTM 28113 Sequencer interface and computer, 1984-85. Donated by Arne Schei
Attachments
UMI-2B-description.jpg
UMI-2B-another-view.jpg

Commie_User
Posts: 916
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 12:50 am

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby Commie_User » Sun Mar 05, 2017 10:19 am

I'm from the Commodore 64 (yeah, literally from it) and we're pretty proud of our SID chip, with all the MIDI gear ever made which we can hook up to it. And then there are all the fancy programs, like Instant Music and Steinberg sequencers. Quite smug, actually.

But when the BBC had something out for it, like the Music 5000 too, the boat was truly pushed out. They still crop up on Ebay but I don't have the money any more. Modern PCs can sequence better but old gear can still do best to synthesize. I've got some brilliant old synths, especially in software, but nothing quite like that.

User avatar
BigEd
Posts: 1486
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:24 am
Location: West
Contact:

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby BigEd » Sat Jul 29, 2017 3:14 am

In Google Maps' walkaround view of the Science Museum: a beeb.

Science-Museum-Micros.png


More starting points within.

More conventional web presence shows the gold-plated beeb.

User avatar
BigEd
Posts: 1486
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:24 am
Location: West
Contact:

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby BigEd » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:43 am

At the PEEK&POKE museum in Rijeka, Croatia - TOOLKIT PLUS:
https://youtu.be/LlzLyhr4yi8?t=4m34s

And SWEET DREAMS on a Master Compact at the Museum of Computer and Information Technology in Katowice, Poland:
https://youtu.be/mcdyxCnZu7A?t=1m5s

Commie_User
Posts: 916
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 12:50 am

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby Commie_User » Wed Sep 06, 2017 10:57 pm

BigEd wrote:Science-Museum-Micros.png


That picture doesn't half remind me of the Capuchin crypt. You can pop by to that, too.

crj
Posts: 315
Joined: Thu May 02, 2013 4:58 pm

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby crj » Wed Sep 06, 2017 11:33 pm

BigEd wrote:In Google Maps' walkaround view of the Science Museum: a beeb.

How times have changed!

35 years ago, BBC Micros were running the exhibits; now they are exhibits.

Commie_User
Posts: 916
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 12:50 am

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby Commie_User » Thu Sep 07, 2017 10:58 am

I hope I'm not the only one but I'm glad I was very young when the BBC did its thing. That way it's more of a happy memory to play on, rather than something I bonded with in a whole heap of projects and programming.

I think they should have put an RM Nimbus 286 on display as well. That was the competitor for the BBCs as the 80s rolled on. And have a couple of working models on display because it's not like there's no Ebay. I think that's what kids want to see anyway - the flint tools we once used in our caves. (And, face it, what we still cling to because they're great fun.)

crj
Posts: 315
Joined: Thu May 02, 2013 4:58 pm

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby crj » Thu Sep 07, 2017 4:14 pm

An old computer isn't really a "tinker for thirty seconds and move on" interactive exhibit of the kind the Science Museum likes. If you want that, there are specialist computer museums you can go to instead, and that's fine as far as I'm concerned.

I think people who grew up at different times will inevitably view the various ages of computing differently.

For me, the strata go:
  • First helped to develop: ARM7
  • First worked with professionally: Archimedes
  • First owned: BBC Micro
  • First programmed: Commodore Pet
  • First learned about by talking to the people who did it: EDSAC
  • In written rather than direct oral history: Turing
Someone who remembers a Risc PC as this computer their parents had when they were a kid, or conversely someone who had worked on mainframes for a decade before buying a personal computer, will have a different perspective on museum exhibits.

Commie_User
Posts: 916
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 12:50 am

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby Commie_User » Fri Sep 08, 2017 2:16 pm

crj wrote:An old computer isn't really a "tinker for thirty seconds and move on" interactive exhibit of the kind the Science Museum likes.


Oh I don't know. They maybe missed a trick if they didn't rig up one of the BBC's heavy trackballs to run with a copy of 3D Bomb Alley: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4HXVe4MeBw

It's beautiful with an analogue joystick. These would be viewed akin to quick phone games now, anyway.


Image

Same with VORTEX and maybe also BATTLE TANK, actually. A slot meter on the screen mains would possibly stop the booth being cluttered with kids - or keep any cuts at bay.

User avatar
BigEd
Posts: 1486
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:24 am
Location: West
Contact:

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby BigEd » Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:33 pm

Spotted a Beeb at 9:50 in this walkaround of last year's Vintage Computer Festival in Zurich:
https://youtu.be/yyTZtli-mlc?t=9m50s

User avatar
BigEd
Posts: 1486
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:24 am
Location: West
Contact:

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby BigEd » Tue Oct 17, 2017 4:42 am

Oh, found the one and only gold-plated Beeb in the virtual Science Museum!
https://goo.gl/maps/QTJiL6sgqdE2

User avatar
pstnotpd
Posts: 392
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 11:05 am

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby pstnotpd » Tue Oct 17, 2017 4:35 pm

I was watching a documentary on the Rosetta mission to Titan. The guy was talking about his team while photo's were being shown of them at work.

Beebs all over the place.

EDIT: This was of course Cassini-Huygens.... and that for a Dutch guy, I'm getting old...
Last edited by pstnotpd on Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
BigEd
Posts: 1486
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:24 am
Location: West
Contact:

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby BigEd » Tue Oct 17, 2017 4:45 pm

Well spotted! At the University of Kent in Canterbury according to a placard:
https://youtu.be/uE5POhMnN78?t=10m11s
and
https://youtu.be/uE5POhMnN78?t=12m7s

User avatar
tautology
Posts: 352
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 2:26 pm

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby tautology » Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:09 pm

I found a beeb during our summer holiday in the Nothe fort in Weymouth. Bonus points for spotting the printing error.
20170721_114523.jpg

User avatar
1024MAK
Posts: 6786
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 4:46 pm
Location: Looking forward to summer in Somerset, UK...

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby 1024MAK » Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:56 pm

Were those disks double the capacity of the 3 inch type :lol:

Mark
For a "Complete BBC Games Archive" visit www.bbcmicro.co.uk NOW!
BeebWiki‬ - for answers to many questions...

User avatar
BigEd
Posts: 1486
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:24 am
Location: West
Contact:

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby BigEd » Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:00 am

Four times!

User avatar
jonb
Posts: 2081
Joined: Sat May 21, 2011 12:42 pm
Location: South Coast of England

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby jonb » Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:45 am

Love the old Fergie monitor with Blu-Tack on the front flap!

Commie_User
Posts: 916
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 12:50 am

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby Commie_User » Wed Oct 18, 2017 4:02 pm

tautology wrote:I found a beeb during our summer holiday in the Nothe fort in Weymouth. Bonus points for spotting the printing error.
20170721_114523.jpg


Right, so this is a museum exhibit, given all these bits have labels on. So why would a fort show off a BBC Micro? Surely that's decades out of the way?

Lord Whatsit of Whatsit couldn't have used one to help fight the Roundheads! :D




And we held the flap of our VCR with Blu Tak too. Gotta say, they go for authenticity at these places, 6-inch floppies or not..

User avatar
martinw
Posts: 1214
Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2010 10:31 am
Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby martinw » Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:05 pm

BBC Micro at the Design Museum, London, on the Apprentice :D

A3B4EAB4-0BE3-46B4-9900-FFE4A8759DAA.jpeg


Martin

User avatar
tautology
Posts: 352
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 2:26 pm

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby tautology » Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:34 am

Commie_User wrote:Right, so this is a museum exhibit, given all these bits have labels on. So why would a fort show off a BBC Micro? Surely that's decades out of the way?


Apparently it was used as a radar and weather station back in the 80s and this set up was showing what was used.

The whole place was filled with very random stuff.

Commie_User
Posts: 916
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 12:50 am

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby Commie_User » Fri Oct 20, 2017 11:10 pm

Amazing. It looks like some operator's only just left it.

Reminds me a little of that reopened US embassy which had closed for ten years, in Iran or somewhere, which still had the computers and furniture and Coke cups just lying around from when they vacated. Less mess here, though.

User avatar
BigEd
Posts: 1486
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:24 am
Location: West
Contact:

Re: Beeb Spotting

Postby BigEd » Tue Oct 24, 2017 8:40 am

Not too surprising, but there's a Beeb in this demonstration of about 7 robot arms at Bletchley Park. One of them is the Atlas arm, with a 6502 inside. Mmm.

Image


Return to “general”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests